Monday 22 Apr 2019 | 19:11 | SYDNEY
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The International Security Program

The International Security Program looks at strategic dynamics and security risks globally, with an emphasis on Australia's region of Indo-Pacific Asia. Its research spans strategic competition and the risks of conflict in Asia, security implications of the rise of China and India, maritime security, nuclear arms control, Australian defence policy and the changing character of conflict. The Program draws on a network of experts in Australia, Asia and globally, and is supported by diverse funding sources including grants from the MacArthur Foundation and the Nuclear Threat Initiative. It convenes international policy dialogues such as the 2017 Australia-ROK Emerging Leaders International Security Forum and has a record of producing leading-edge, influential reports.

Experts

Latest Publications

Indo-Pacific security links

'Indo-Pacific' is an increasingly recognised term in the analysis of Asian strategic issues. Of course, there’s debate about what it means and the extent to which such a super-sized region can be a meaningful frame of reference for policymaking. And its subregions of North Asia, South Asia and

A maritime school of strategic thought for Australia

In hindsight, 2012-13 might come to be seen as a watershed period for maritime strategic thinking in Australian defence policy. During the 37 years that Australian governments have produced defence white papers, the notion of maritime strategy has been applied in only half of these documents,

Israel has no need to worry about Obama

Dougal Robinson is a Lowy Institute Project Research Assistant. The US and Iran held a one-hour bilateral meeting in Geneva on Tuesday as part of negotiations on Iran's nuclear program, but two-thirds of Jewish Israelis believe President Barack Obama will fail to prevent an Iranian nuclear weapon.

Is Japan alarmed by China's rise?

The FT's Gideon Rachman on Japan's security fears (emphasis mine):  Abe’s radicalism is not driven solely by domestic economics. Japan has also been jolted into action by the perception of a growing threat from China. The Chinese economy surpassed Japan’s in size in 2011; the gap is

Rubbery figures: Chinese military R&D

Dennis Blasko is a Senior Research Scientist in China Studies for CNA Analysis & Solutions. Senior Research Scientist, China Studies Senior Research Scientist, China Studies For most of the past decade, organisations and individuals estimating China's 'actual' or 'true' defence-related spending

China's really big military R&D effort

The scale of China's military research and development effort has been underestimated in the open source literature, perhaps by as much as 50%, says Associate Professor Tai Ming Cheung, director of the Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at the University of California. It's difficult to

Why does defence spending rise and fall?

Lots of reasons, as you would expect. Shifting priorities: societies make choices about what matters to them most, and Western countries increasingly value social welfare spending over national security. Threat perception: it's hard to avoid the conclusion that the decline in European defence

Reader riposte: How do we know when we're at cyberwar?

Alexander Mack writes: Expanding on Ian Wallace’s question of: ...how should governments deal with cyber acts that have a national security impact (espionage, sabotage and subversion, if you will) but which fall below the threshold of ‘war’, especially when the perpetrators are based

Reader riposte: What is 'cyberwar', anyway?

Darragh Murray writes: I found the recently published post by Ian Wallace another example of a somewhat frustrating article on ‘cyber’ warfare. That there is some kind of 'warfare' taking place on telecommunications networks (outside of fictional networked video games) is increasingly

US-China: Why things won't go well

Deep and rather arresting pessimism here about the future of US-China relations from Jennifer Lind and Daryl Press: The best hope for amicable U.S.-China relations rests on Beijing adopting a highly restrained grand strategy, but it would be historically unprecedented if it did so. China would be

Joint Strike Fighter: Vanity Fair piles on

Much better than Four Corners' effort from January, because it presents the case for the JSF as well as against. Still it's a damning portrait of a flawed aircraft that is protected from serious scrutiny: The political process that keeps the Joint Strike Fighter airborne has never stalled. The

Revisiting the 'Asian arms race' debate

Chris Rahman is a Senior Research Fellow in Maritime Strategy and Security at the University of Wollongong. The hoary question of whether Asia is experiencing a naval arms race has been a persistent topic of strategic debate for the best part of two decades. This is perhaps understandable given the

Syria: Ready, aim...wait a minute

To say that Saturday's White House decision to delay a military strike on Syrian targets in order to seek Congressional approval was unexpected would be an understatement. But when you are the commander-in-chief of a very powerful military and the political leader of a democratic country that is

Indonesia wants gunships for WHAT?

This news comes as a bit of a surprise: Indonesia's Defence Ministry has concluded a deal with the US for the purchase of eight AH-64 Apache helicopter gunships. The Australian Government will probably look kindly on this*. For one thing, as the ABC points out, it suggests US-Indonesia military

Chemical weapons use in Syria: Who, what, why?

Rod Barton was a senior UN weapons inspector in Iraq. He is the author of The Weapons Detective: The Inside Story of Australia's Top Weapons Inspector. It is difficult from media reporting to sort fact from fiction about allegations of chemical weapons use in Syria. The chaos of war and the desire

US reveals new Darwin Marines move

Cameron Stewart writes in The Australian today about the announcement by the US Chief of Naval Operations (from his Navigation Plan 2014-2018) that he aims to 'provide amphibious lift for US marines operating out of Australia by establishing a fifth amphibious readiness group in the Pacific by

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