Published daily by the Lowy Institute

Tim Harcourt

Tim Harcourt is the J.W. Nevile Fellow in Economics at the Australian School of Business at the University of New South Wales. Tim was also for over a decade the first chief economist of the Australian Trade Commission (Austrade).


Articles by Tim Harcourt (4)

  • Zika and the economics of epidemics

    There is always an 'X' factor in economics, something that comes from out of the blue to shock markets and the global community. There are often geo-political shocks a financial collapse or a public health issue. So far, factor X in 2016 could be Zika. Brazil was all ready to party at the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in August but it is now bracing itself for Zika.
  • Should I stay or should I go? Europhobia and the consequences of Brexit

    You can't blame the Europeans. The original grand European project had the best of intentions. In the shadows of the bitter and bloody World War Two the leaders of France and Germany decided they never wanted to go to war again. The hope was that binding Europe together in an economic union would prevent any outbreak of future military conflict. To begin with the plan was straightforward enough; a customs union reducing tariffs between a handful of states.
  • Abenomics: Have the arrows misfired?

    Shinzo Abe came to power as Japan’s Prime Minister vowing to remake the country after decades of little or no growth, deflation, and structural decline with an ageing population and arthritic industries. Abe, leader of Japan’s centre right Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), that has dominated Japan in the post-war years, promised to stimulate the economy, provide the appropriate monetary policy setting, and structural reform at the microeconomic level.
  • Pacific trade: Sisters doing it for themselves

    There's been a lot of talk about getting women into top positions in business in Australia, but our friends in the Pacific have been walking the walk. The inaugural Pacific Export Survey 2014 reveals that around 27% of exporting small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the Pacific are run by women, compared to 11% of exporters in Australia according to the DHL Export Barometer.