Tuesday 22 Aug 2017 | 00:17 | SYDNEY
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  • 21 Aug 2017 17:08

    Wolf Warrior II: Chinese exceptionalism is box office gold

    The film reflects the increasingly widespread view in China that it has thrown off the shackles of a century of humiliation and emerged as a power equal to - if not better than - its Western counterparts.

  • 21 Aug 2017 14:33

    India feeling the heat on Belt and Road

    A growing political-military nexus between China and Pakistan, as currently seems likely, will further aggravate security competition with India.

  • 21 Aug 2017 12:12

    O Canada! Australia's best hope in the global IP struggle

    Australia's best hope is that Canada, which shares our position as a major net user of IP, will work hard in the NAFTA negotiations to defend our common interests.

G20 Studies Centre

From 2012 to 2016, the G20 Studies Centre at the Lowy Institute for International Policy produced independent research on global economic governance and the role of the G20, and supported research networks in Australia and overseas. The Australian Government provided funding to establish the Centre.

The archives of the Centre’s quarterly G20 Monitors (as well as other publications from the G20 Studies Centre) are available below. The Monitor brought together opinions from Australia and around the world to discuss developments in the G20 and suggest policy ideas.

The Lowy Institute will continue to comment and publish on economic governance issues.

Experts

Latest Publications

G20 Monitor: Towards Hangzhou and Hamburg

The 21st edition of the G20 Monitor highlights considerations for the G20 ahead of the 4–5 September 2016 G20 Leaders’ Summit in Hangzhou, China. It also canvasses three topics that are possibly of interest to the 2017 German G20 Presidency: cyber rule-setting, global migration governance, and

Making the most of the G20

In this Lowy Institute Analysis, G20 Studies Centre Research Fellow and Project Director Tristram Sainsbury and Research Associate Hannah Wurf argue that the G20 should be at the centre of Australia’s approach to international economic engagement in the years ahead. Photo: Getty Images/VCG

Yes, monetary policy does still work

Did you know that Australia once had a double dissolution election where the trigger was the conduct of monetary policy? It was our second double dissolution election, in 1951  (we are currently looking at our seventh), and the question at hand was the management of the Commonwealth Bank, which

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