Sunday 07 Mar 2021 | 23:38 | SYDNEY
What's happening on
  • 5 Mar 2021 11:00

    Her brilliant career

    An entertaining and informative memoir about a woman’s career through a deeply patriarchal profession in diplomacy.

  • 5 Mar 2021 06:00

    Vaccine hesitancy and the risks in rural Papua New Guinea

    Another vaccine drive could cause resentment among those who feel they don’t need it because “they are not sick”.

  • 4 Mar 2021 14:00

    An endless game of whack-a-mole?

    The efficacy of proscribing extreme-right groups is debated. How to keep ahead of their evolution is also challenging.

China

Double trouble: China's bid to increase birth rate is no sure thing

By Marie-Alice McLean-Dreyfus, an intern with the Lowy Institute's East Asia Program China's historic policy change to allow all couples to have two children was presented as an economic imperative, but some believe individual choice, increasingly encouraged to drive consumption, will decide family

How did the Chinese media react to the Tianjin explosions?

By Jackson Kwok, an intern in the Lowy Institute's East Asia Program, and Merriden Varrall, Director of the East Asia Program, Lowy Institute. It has now been more than a week since the explosions in Tianjin occurred. Discussions on online social networks such as Weibo (China's version of Twitter)

Lowy poll shows that values matter in foreign policy

The 2015 Lowy Institute Poll reveals a great deal about Australian attitudes towards China, both in terms of our bilateral relationship, but also how China fits into our broader sense of economic and political security alongside other actors such as the US. It would appear that values and ideals

Why do so many Chinese expect war?

A professor of classical music in Beijing startled me in 2010 when he said, 'when I look at my students, I fear we are headed for war within five years.' 'War with whom?', I enquired. 'With anyone.' His students don't seem like fenqing ('angry youth'). They are in a musical conservatory, after

Hong Kong's twisted political pathology

Another month, another huge political street protest in Hong Kong. Last Sunday the territory's residents marched again, this time against the planned but so far unscheduled Occupy Central sit-in. Just as July's pro-democracy marchers comprised a broad cross-section of Hong Kong society, so did the

Why is Hong Kong unhappy?

Here in Hong Kong these days, you can't pick up a newspaper (metaphorically speaking) without seeing headlines on two topics: the people-to-people relationship between Hong Kong and mainland China, and Hong Kong's political decision-making process. The two issues appear to run at very different

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