Friday 25 Sep 2020 | 16:59 | SYDNEY
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Climate change

Australia's carbon debate mirrors global follies

Roger Pielke Jr is a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado. Australia’s longest-running tragedy is starting a new season with a new cast but the same familiar follies. Of course I am talking about Australian climate policy. Before Julia Gillard was deposed she had

Reader riposte: Pro- and anti-nuclear environmentalism

Richard Broinowski writes: Lowy Institute Research Fellow Daniela Strube should perhaps spend a bit more time examining trends in energy research. The pro-nuclear environmentalists portrayed in the film Pandora’s Promise are neither intriguing nor rare. For it is a standard ploy of big energy

China's environmental crisis, close up

China watcher James West writes for The Atlantic on his latest train trip through China, and has a short accompanying video (above): I have never before been as dumbfounded as during a train ride this week from Beijing through a swathe of China’s northeast coal belt... ...The scene could be a

Abbott's 'so-called' carbon market

Opposition Leader Tony Abbott's clumsy remarks on climate change ('a so-called market, in the non-delivery of an invisible substance to no one') have been roundly criticised and interpreted as a 'dog whistle' to the climate sceptic wing of his party's supporter base. So what was he really getting

Rudd should scrap, not hasten, EU carbon linkage

Fergus Green is a researcher specialising in climate change policy. Here we go again. The Labor Government is contemplating weakening the carbon scheme for what must be about the seventh time since Rudd Mk 1 was elected in 2007. Rudd cabinet Mk 2 is rumoured to be considering curtailing the

Do voters want to repeal carbon pricing?

John Connor is CEO of the Climate Institute. The past year has been historic in Australia, with around 300 businesses beginning to pay for their greenhouse gas emissions for the first time under carbon laws that had a troublesome gestation and a difficult birth. The last year and the couple

What to do about climate migration

Professor Jane McAdam is a member of the Consultative Committee of the Nansen Initiative and the author of Climate Change, Forced Migration, and International Law.  Last month, the Norwegian Refugee Council released a report revealing that 32.4 million people were forced to flee their homes in

Carbon pricing: Let the jury decide

Nicholas Gruen is CEO of Lateral Economics, Chairman of the Australian Centre for Social Innovation, an entrepreneur involved in a number of internet startups, and a regular Fairfax columnist. I concluded my previous post on climate change (cross-posted at Club Troppo) by asking rhetorically

Martin Wolf's climate pessimism examined

Nicholas Gruen is CEO of Lateral Economics, Chairman of the Australian Centre for Social Innovation, an entrepreneur involved in a number of internet startups, and a regular Fairfax columnist. I was contemplating writing a post on Martin Wolf's latest Jeremiad on climate change when Sam

Martin Wolf's climate change column

Further to the thread I started on Monday about Martin Wolf's pessimistic column, I've had an email from economist John Quiggin which goes directly to the source of Wolf's (and my) pessimism. For Wolf, the problem is that the case for acting against climate change is always based around privation

Climate change: After activism

Martin Wolf got my weekend off to a dreadful start. I read his latest FT column (Why the World Faces Climate Chaos) on Friday, and it's been on my mind ever since. Wolf is hardly the first to lay out the reasons why climate change is such a diabolical policy problem. But if, like me, you

China and the Arctic: What's the fuss?

For a few hours this evening Australian time, media outlets from around the world will zoom in on Kiruna, Sweden's northernmost city of 18,000 inhabitants and host to the Arctic Council ministerial meeting. The foreign ministers of the eight Arctic Council member states – Canada, Denmark, Finland

No, Europe's ETS definitely doesn't work

Roger Pielke Jr is a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado. Here's his initial post on this topic. After the European parliament voted down a proposal to prop up its flagship emissions trading scheme (ETS), most observers finally admitted what has been obvious for a

So, Europe's ETS works after all?

Last Monday's Interpreter piece from Environmental Studies Professor Roger Pielke Jr was one of a number of commentaries in the international media arguing that Europe's emissions trading scheme (ETS) had essentially failed as a mechanism for reducing carbon emissions. Now I see that there's

Europe's ETS: Good branding, poor substance

Roger Pielke Jr is a Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Colorado. Last week, in a surprise to many, the European parliament defeated a proposal to postpone the auctioning of emissions permits, a move that would have propped up prices in the bloc's carbon market, known as the

Fragile shifts in carbon tech and diplomacy

John Connor is CEO of the Climate Institute. As John Howard put it, the period from 2005 to 2007 represented a 'perfect storm' for climate action. Domestically, bushfires, water shortages in capital cities and calls from leading businesses for long, loud and legal carbon pricing built pressure

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