Commentary | 04 March 2010

China reform

Liu Xiaobo, one of the most celebrated public intellectuals in China, was recently sentenced to 11 years in prison for incitement to subversion. Diplomats and human rights activists have joined in condemning the sentence on grounds both of its lack of legal validity and its severity. A groundswell of international sentiment has begun to build, reversing the tendency in recent years to avoid confronting China on its human rights record. The international concern is closely paralleled by concern in China’s domestic intellectual circles.On Thursday, 4 March, the Lowy Institute hosted an in-conversation event with two prominent Sinologists, David Kelly and Feng Chongyi, who joined Michael Wesley to discuss the significance and implications of this event for China’s internal politics and Australia-China relations.Michael Wesley , David Kelly , Chongyi Feng

  • Michael Wesley
  • David Kelly
  • Chongyi Feng

Liu Xiaobo, one of the most celebrated public intellectuals in China, was recently sentenced to 11 years in prison for incitement to subversion. Diplomats and human rights activists have joined in condemning the sentence on grounds both of its lack of legal validity and its severity. A groundswell of international sentiment has begun to build, reversing the tendency in recent years to avoid confronting China on its human rights record. The international concern is closely paralleled by concern in China’s domestic intellectual circles.On Thursday, 4 March, the Lowy Institute hosted an in-conversation event with two prominent Sinologists, David Kelly and Feng Chongyi, who joined Michael Wesley to discuss the significance and implications of this event for China’s internal politics and Australia-China relations.Michael Wesley , David Kelly , Chongyi Feng

  • Michael Wesley
  • David Kelly
  • Chongyi Feng