Commentary | 05 July 2011

Grasping the nettle: why reintegration is central to operational design in southern Afghanistan

Reintegration not only has a role for all actors in a counterinsurgency — police, civil and military — but indeed demands of them a common purpose, and a truly concerted effort to attain it. Moreover, lasting reintegration is much harder to foster and generate than simply announcing a policy.

In the inaugural Occasional Paper released by the Asia-Pacific Civil-Military Centre of Excellence, former Chief of Army Visiting Fellow and Lowy Institute contributor Lieutenant Colonel Nick Floyd argues that the reintegration of Afghan society can be viewed as a core component of the Coalition’s strategic success, and a focusing purpose to the design of operations along and across all avenues of endeavour.

The article can be read here.

  • Nicholas Floyd

Reintegration not only has a role for all actors in a counterinsurgency — police, civil and military — but indeed demands of them a common purpose, and a truly concerted effort to attain it. Moreover, lasting reintegration is much harder to foster and generate than simply announcing a policy.

In the inaugural Occasional Paper released by the Asia-Pacific Civil-Military Centre of Excellence, former Chief of Army Visiting Fellow and Lowy Institute contributor Lieutenant Colonel Nick Floyd argues that the reintegration of Afghan society can be viewed as a core component of the Coalition’s strategic success, and a focusing purpose to the design of operations along and across all avenues of endeavour.

The article can be read here.

  • Nicholas Floyd