Commentary | 27 April 2006

The high price of feeding the hungry dragon

In a Comment piece for the Financial Times, Mark Thirlwell looks at how China's appetite for resources is reshaping bilateral ties with a range of commodity exporters. Using Australia as an example, he argues that while feeding the hungry dragon is proving to be an economically rewarding experience, it also adds a new diplomatic and strategic element to the macroeconomic issues more typically associated with managing a resource boom. Commodity exporters should not make the mistake of thinking that their relationship with China will be confined to taking Beijing's money and shipping product. China has great power aspirations and superpowers, even prospective ones, tend to view their relationships with suppliers in a much broader perspective than in purely commercial terms.Financial Times, 27 April 2006, p. 13Mark Thirlwell

  • Mark Thirlwell

In a Comment piece for the Financial Times, Mark Thirlwell looks at how China's appetite for resources is reshaping bilateral ties with a range of commodity exporters. Using Australia as an example, he argues that while feeding the hungry dragon is proving to be an economically rewarding experience, it also adds a new diplomatic and strategic element to the macroeconomic issues more typically associated with managing a resource boom. Commodity exporters should not make the mistake of thinking that their relationship with China will be confined to taking Beijing's money and shipping product. China has great power aspirations and superpowers, even prospective ones, tend to view their relationships with suppliers in a much broader perspective than in purely commercial terms.Financial Times, 27 April 2006, p. 13Mark Thirlwell

  • Mark Thirlwell