| 23 April 2004

Integration: "think global, act regional"

As international integration continues, the scarcity of rules governing these cross-country relationships becomes more pressing. The multilateral framework has gone some distance to proving international rules, but these can be usefully supplemented both by regional efforts to get a louder voice in international rule-making and by regional institutions. Within the East Asian region, efforts have been intensified since the Asian crisis. Whatever the pace and final outcome of these efforts, Australia ought to be part of the debate. Of course, we can only do so by invitation, but we should demonstrate our readiness to take part, and show our credentials as a country that can offer different and complementary skills and attitudes.A version of this paper will be included in a volume on Regional Integration in the Asia Pacific, to be published jointly by the OECD, the Hawke Centre and the Academy of Sciences at the end of 2004.Stephen Grenville

  • Stephen Grenville

As international integration continues, the scarcity of rules governing these cross-country relationships becomes more pressing. The multilateral framework has gone some distance to proving international rules, but these can be usefully supplemented both by regional efforts to get a louder voice in international rule-making and by regional institutions. Within the East Asian region, efforts have been intensified since the Asian crisis. Whatever the pace and final outcome of these efforts, Australia ought to be part of the debate. Of course, we can only do so by invitation, but we should demonstrate our readiness to take part, and show our credentials as a country that can offer different and complementary skills and attitudes.A version of this paper will be included in a volume on Regional Integration in the Asia Pacific, to be published jointly by the OECD, the Hawke Centre and the Academy of Sciences at the end of 2004.Stephen Grenville

  • Stephen Grenville