Speeches | 20 September 2010

Little power, big choices: Australia's strategic future

In the Lowy Institute's fourth Strategic Snapshot, Research Associate and Asia Security Project Coordinator Raoul Heinrichs explores the strategic challenges confronting Australia as shifting power balances in Asia produce new calculations among the region's major powers.Building on Power and Choice, the Lowy Institute's major report on Asian Security Futures, Mr Heinrichs argues that while US primacy or a 'concert of Asia' are the most preferable futures for Australia, a competitive balance of power is the most likely. Between new risks for Canberra of being dragged into competition and old fears of being left to fend for itself, Mr Heinrichs recommends a major build-up of Australia's independent strategic weight, and reduced reliance on the United States, as a hedge against the most serious dangers arising from Asia's transition.

Raoul Heinrichs

  • Raoul Heinrichs

In the Lowy Institute's fourth Strategic Snapshot, Research Associate and Asia Security Project Coordinator Raoul Heinrichs explores the strategic challenges confronting Australia as shifting power balances in Asia produce new calculations among the region's major powers.Building on Power and Choice, the Lowy Institute's major report on Asian Security Futures, Mr Heinrichs argues that while US primacy or a 'concert of Asia' are the most preferable futures for Australia, a competitive balance of power is the most likely. Between new risks for Canberra of being dragged into competition and old fears of being left to fend for itself, Mr Heinrichs recommends a major build-up of Australia's independent strategic weight, and reduced reliance on the United States, as a hedge against the most serious dangers arising from Asia's transition.

Raoul Heinrichs

  • Raoul Heinrichs