Speeches | 28 June 2011

The politics of saving the world and the consequences of catch up

It is increasingly evident that the global economy is going to be reliant on and at the mercy of the natural environment in the coming decades. What does this mean for Australia? As a nation vulnerable to climate change but also blessed with abundant renewable energy sources, how is it that Australia has fallen so far behind? Drawing on his experience as head of the largest international environmental campaigning organisation, Greenpeace International Executive Director Kumi Naidoo provided a perspective on growing global efforts to address climate change and challenged the Australian perception that little is currently being done as an argument for inaction. Kumi Naidoo

  • Kumi Naidoo

It is increasingly evident that the global economy is going to be reliant on and at the mercy of the natural environment in the coming decades. What does this mean for Australia? As a nation vulnerable to climate change but also blessed with abundant renewable energy sources, how is it that Australia has fallen so far behind? Drawing on his experience as head of the largest international environmental campaigning organisation, Greenpeace International Executive Director Kumi Naidoo provided a perspective on growing global efforts to address climate change and challenged the Australian perception that little is currently being done as an argument for inaction. Kumi Naidoo

  • Kumi Naidoo