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Thursday 17 Aug 2017 | 21:26 | SYDNEY
Thursday 17 Aug 2017 | 21:26 | SYDNEY

Climate skeptics tilting at windfarms

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COMMENTS

22 January 2008 12:02

A few weeks ago I, along with most of my colleagues on the staff and the board of the Lowy Institute, received a complimentary copy of a book called 'Unstoppable Global Warming – Every 1,500 Years', by S. Fred Singer and Dennis T. Avery. When I arrived at work there was an enormous pile of these tomes sitting at the Institute’s reception.

The book appears to be a fairly standard example of the ‘climate change skeptic’ genre. Contrary to the overwhelming scientific consensus captured in the most recent report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the authors argue that most global warming is not caused by human activities but by a natural 1500-year climate cycle, and that it is not nearly as dangerous as the Al Gores of this world make out.

I regret to say that this book does not have an authoritative feeling about it, starting with the spelling error in the publisher’s name on the title page. A search of the authors’ names by my colleague Kate Mason took us to the far-right reaches of the Internet, including links to research questioning the link between passive smoking and lung cancer, jeremiads against organic food, and the websites of various American think tanks with the word ‘freedom’ in their title.

Anyway, people can write whatever nonsense they like; I’m more interested in the fact that someone, somewhere is sending out thousands of copies of this book to anyone they can think of who may be in a position to influence the public debate. The book’s Preface states that: ‘A public relations campaign of staggering dimensions is being carried forward to convince us that global warming is man-made and a crisis.’ It looks like an expensive campaign is being run against those propositions, too.

I doubt whether it is a very effective campaign, though. The sheer oddness of the whole exercise – both the message and the means of communicating it – leaves the distinct impression that history has passed these people by.

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