Published daily by the Lowy Institute

Tristram Sainsbury

Tristram Sainsbury is a Research Fellow and Project Director at the G20 Studies Centre at the Lowy Institute. Prior to joining the Institute, Tristram was at the Australian Treasury where worked on G20 policy, focussing mainly on international financial architecture reform, financial regulation reform and G20 growth strategies. Prior to that he spent time in the Australian Treasury’s revenue forecasting and environmental fiscal policy areas. He has also worked at the Crawford School at the Australian National University on behalf of the Australian Treasury. Tristram holds a Masters in Applied Economics from ANU and has completed undergraduate studies in Resource Economics at the University of Sydney. He is a visiting fellow at the Chongyang Institute for Financial Studies at Renmin University.


Articles by Tristram Sainsbury (37)

  • The AIIB and NDB BRICS enter a new phase

    'Only one of these institutions sounds like a new bank'. That was the conclusion of one attendee at the Think20 Conference in Shanghai in February after a session featuring four international financial institutions: the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), the New Development Bank BRICS (NDB), the Asian Development Bank, and the OECD. The  first loans from the BRICS NDB will fund solar projects  (Photo courtesy Flick user minoru karamatsu)
  • The global financial safety net needs fixing

    How much attention do we need to pay to the global economic 'Plan B'? This question was the subject of a G20 high-level seminar on the international financial architecture in Paris last week and is sure to occupy the attention of policymakers at the 2016 IMF and World Bank Group Spring meetings — and the concurrent meetings of G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors — in Washington next week. First of all, what is Plan B? The global financial safety net is the world's Plan B.
  • Panama Papers show international efforts to tackle 'dirty' money have lacked oomph

    The issue of financial secrecy has returned to global headlines thanks to the Panama Papers. The year-long investigation by global journalists into 11 million encrypted documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonesca has revealed the secret offshore holdings from a large number of prominent individuals, including 128 politicians and 12 world leaders, and gives a much better idea of how massive and widespread the practice is.
  • Panama papers show international efforts to tackle 'dirty' money lack oomph

    The issue of financial secrecy has returned to global headlines thanks to the Panama papers. The year-long investigation by global journalists into 11 million encrypted documents from Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonesca shines a light on secret offshore holdings from a large number of prominent individuals, including 128 politicians and 12 world leaders, and gives a much better glimpse into exactly how massive and widespread the practice is.It certainly is big business.
  • G20 update: Finance ministers disappoint but China's leadership shows promise

    G20 discussions were back in international media headlines during the last week, as Shanghai hosted the first major meeting of China's 2016 G20 Presidency.  The concluding statement issued by finance ministers and central bank governors on Saturday was strong on rhetoric, and Chinese leadership has managed to insert a sense of momentum back into G20 discussions. But the meeting will disappoint the many who called for the G20 to be more active in addressing economic vulnerabilities and risks.
  • Can China revive the G20?

    Shanghai will welcome finance ministers and central bank governors for the first major meeting of China's G20 Presidency at the end of this week. It should be an instructive meeting for a variety of reasons.  As I point out in the latest G20 Monitor, the global economy continues to face significant short and long-term challenges.
  • IMF: the hard yards on reform are still to come

    It finally happened. The US delivered on its long-standing promise to deliver the 2010 IMF quota and governance reforms, spreading a cascade of pre-Christmas cheer across the economic policymaking world. My colleague Mike Callaghan has neatly summarised the implications on US leadership. I want to focus on a different dimension of the decision's strategic impact, namely what it means for policymakers.
  • On China's 2016 to-do list: stop the IMF running out of cash

    The ANU's Adam Triggs recently argued in the East Asia Forum that the G20 will have to deal with a potentially pernicious issue: what to do about the $379.7 billion of bilateral loans that will begin to expire from late 2016. Triggs is right to point out that if one third of IMF funding expires, this could introduce unacceptable systemic risk, given the loans are still in place because of continued vulnerabilities in the global economy. But let’s get a few things straight.