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Monday 21 Aug 2017 | 11:12 | SYDNEY
Monday 21 Aug 2017 | 11:12 | SYDNEY

Migration & border policy links: E-meeting migrants, Obama's plan foiled, Afghanistan crisis and more

COMMENTS

6 October 2016 17:54

By Rachael Buckland, an intern with the Migration and Border Policy Project

  • An Amnesty International report shows 10 countries – Turkey, Jordan, Pakistan, Lebanon, Iran, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo and Chad – which account for less than 2.5% of world GDP take in 56% of the world's refugees.
  • A freedom of information request by Australian National University student newspaper Woroni has revealed the university implemented a diversification strategy in 2015 to lower Chinese student enrolment.
  • The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission issued a warning about a scam targeting migrants in Australia following more than 300 reports of bogus immigration officers who demand money to prevent deportation.
  • Lowy Institute's Migration and Border Policy Project Director, Dr Jiyoung Song, spoke with ABC radio about global disparity in refugee hosting, outlining how wealthy states should respond to criticism.
  • Lowy Institute's Migration and Border Policy Nonresident Fellow, Dr Khalid Koser, will appear on Q&A next Monday night to discuss Australian refugee policy.
  • UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd has dismissed talk of changes to the current visa requirements for Australians entering the UK, despite discussion of the same by Boris Johnson earlier this year.
  • Ex BBC Radio Director Helen Boaden delivered a stirring speech at Prix Italia Festival, drawing on the current refugee crisis in Europe and criticising the state of modern journalism.
  • Following a Brookings Institute forum on the urban dimensions of refugee integration, visiting fellow Robert L McKenzie unpacked why cities matter in migration discourse.
  • The EU's executive body, the European Commission, has launched a Boarder and Coast Guard agency to meet the region's migration and internal security challenges.
  • In this post various experts answer a question posed by Carnegie's Judy Dempsey: Is Central Europe destroying EU solidarity?
  • National Geographic has published an online interactive, The New Europeans, which allows visitors to e-meet immigrants shaping Europe. 
  • The EU's asylum resettlement plan was emphatically voted down in a referendum in Hungary this week, rejected by nearly 98% of those who took party. However, only 40.4% of Hungary's population cast valid ballots. In this blog, Brookings Institute Nonresident Fellow Matteo Garavoglia reflects what the referendum says about Europe's politics and policy making.
  • Some 28 migrants hoping to reach Europe drowned off the Libyan coast on Tuesday. The total rescued over the past two days exceeds 10,000.
  • The US Supreme Court has rejected the Obama administration's request to rehear an immigration case, thwarting plans to provide an alternative to deportation for millions of undocumented immigrants. The decision means a lower court injunction, that prevents Obama's program from coming into effect, remains in place.
  • This CSIS Cogit Asia podcast on Transnational Security in Central Asia examines the region's porous borders in the context of human trafficking and foreign fighters.
  • A proposed amendment to the Indian Citizenship Act seeking to grant citizenship to non-Muslim minorities from Muslim majority countries – including Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis and Christians from Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan – has attracted plenty of criticism, as reported by The Diplomat.
  • International Crisis Group has released a statement about the economic underpinnings of the evolving humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, where the number of 'people of concern' doubled between 2013 and 2015 to reach 1.77 million.

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