Saturday 31 Oct 2020 | 21:21 | SYDNEY
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Australia in the World

Australia as exemplar

OK, so the Australian election is not exactly capturing the world's imagination, but as Richard Green argued last week, 'Australia has done the most good in the world, and can continue to do so, simply by managing itself well, providing an example to learn from.' Fareed Zakaria's latest column

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

Short posts from Lowy Institute experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. See the Election Interpreter 2013 archive for the whole series. When it does emerge as a campaign issue, both parties compete to show who has more ownership of

The election, from overseas

Below, a collection of links to international coverage of the Australian elections. As you will see, most media outlets rely on news agencies like Reuters, AP and AFP to provide coverage, and the emphasis tends to be on scandals, gaffes and 'colour'. BBC Sydney correspondent Jon Donnison is

Ashes aint what they used to be

I have mixed feelings about Rodger Shanahan's piece on the Ashes and the way Australia views its Old Enemy, England. Maybe we do hate the England cricket team, but we seem to be disguising it pretty well. I haven't noticed any mass burnings of souvenir team shirts or mobs storming Cricket

Pacific leadership: PNG gets its chance

Competing claims for leadership of the Pacific Islands region are reinforcing doubts about the efficacy of regional architecture in the lead-up to the Pacific Islands Forum Leaders' summit in Majuro in the Marshall Islands in the first week of September. The Fiji Government hosted the Pacific

The Anglosphere and the Ashes

Much has been made of the defence and security aspects of the Anglosphere and the other commonalities that bind us together. But within the Anglosphere there is one aspect of the relationship that is both so endearingly anachronistic and so politically incorrect that it is interesting it has stood

First leaders' debate

The world outside Australia did not intrude much on last evening's Leaders' Debate at the National Press Club. And for Richard Green, who posted his version of our 'In 100 Words' feature (what's the most important international policy issue of the campaign, in 100 words?) on Club Troppo last Friday

Medcalf-Hutcheon on Carr-Bishop

The ABC's Jane Hutcheon, a former foreign correspondent and now host of ABC News 24's One Plus One, asked some probing questions of Foreign Minister Bob Carr and his shadow Julie Bishop during Wednesday night's foreign policy debate. Here she is with the Lowy Institute's Rory Medcalf, who was also a

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

Hugh Jorgensen is a Research Associate in the Lowy Institute's G20 Studies Centre. See every short post from our experts on the most important international policy issue of this campaign.  Australia's G20 presidency commences 1 December, meaning the election winner has a unique opportunity to

The Pacific in the foreign policy debate

It was great to see Australia's relations with Pacific Islands feature in last night's foreign policy debate and particularly pleasing to see this issue raised outside of the inevitable focus on the PNG asylum seeker deal. Overall, I thought Ms Bishop demonstrated greater commitment to enhancing

Carr and Bishop dodge the difficult questions on Indonesia

It was nice to see one of seven questions at last night's foreign policy debate focus on Indonesia, as a chance to draw out each party's plan to develop the relationship. Overall though, I thought each side's answers dodged some of the more difficult questions facing Australia-Indonesia ties.

If the G20 is so great, why isn't Rudd going?

Hugh Jorgensen is a Research Associate in the Lowy Institute's G20 Studies Centre. It took me three years of work to get us into the G20. We are hosting it next year. To have this jammed up against a federal election date is a problem and if I can overcome that problem I will. — Kevin

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

See every short post from our experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. Danielle Rajendram is a Lowy Institute research associate. Since a low point during the 2009-10 student crisis, Australia's relations with India have steadily improved.

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

Short posts from Lowy Institute experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. See the Election Interpreter 2013 archive for the whole series. How we plan to steer the Australian economy and the expectations that help shape it between the Scylla of

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

Short posts from our experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. Jack Georgieff is a research associate with the Lowy Institute's International Security program. Clearly the most important issue in the current campaign is how to simultaneously

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

Short posts from Lowy Institute experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. See the Election Interpreter 2013 archive for the whole series. Australia needs to get ready for the risks as well as the opportunities of an Asian Century: that should

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

We kick off our election coverage with short posts from Lowy Institute experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. Asylum seekers and people smuggling ought not to be the main international policy issues of the campaign, but each party has placed

In 100 words: The most important issue of this campaign

We kick off our election coverage with short posts from Lowy Institute experts on what they regard as the most important international policy issue of this campaign. The most important but least discussed issue of the campaign will be population policy. After the Asian Century White Paper

The EU's dysfunctional asylum system

Benedict Coleridge recently worked as a policy researcher for Jesuit Refugee Service Europe. He will soon begin graduate study at the University of Oxford. I recently returned from Brussels, where I researched and wrote a report on the Balkans as a transit route for forced migrants attempting to

TPP: The fight over investment rights

Amy Schwebel is a research officer for the Australian Council of Trade Unions. After three-and-a-half years of negotiation, the investment chapter of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), a regional trade agreement being negotiated by countries across Asia and the Pacific, remains hotly

Indonesia relations: Three lessons from Timor

Iain Henry is a Fulbright Scholar and PhD Candidate at ANU's Strategic and Defence Studies Centre. He tweets at @IainDHenry. Recent events have thrust the Australia-Indonesia relationship back into the spotlight. Managing this relationship will be one of the next Government's highest

G20 Brisbane: Can Australia do the 'vision thing'?

Mike Callaghan is Director of the Lowy Institute's G20 Studies Centre. Tax and trade will be two high profile issues on the G20 agenda when Australia chairs the forum in 2014. These two topics have a common driver: can policy keep up with a rapidly changing global production landscape? On trade,

When aid gets a seat at the cabinet table

Annalisa Prizzon is an economist with the Overseas Development Institute, the UK's leading development think tank. Australia hasn't had a Minister of International Development since the mid-1990s, but the appointment of Melissa Parke MP to the Rudd ministry on 1 July in that role came as little

Asylum seekers: The cost to Defence

There must be days when the Chief of the Defence Force and Secretary of Defence pine for the creation of an Australian Coast Guard, just so they can prise the Australian Defence Force away from the toxic debate on Australia's asylum seeker policy. Labor's PNG solution will rely on the ADF to

PNG reacts strongly to asylum seeker deal

Martyn Namorong is a multi-award winning writer, blogger and television presenter. His initial reaction to the PNG-Australia asylum seeker agreement appeared on The Interpreter yesterday. From online postings to offline activism, a new generation of protest-hardened Papua New Guineans is making

RAMSI, ten years on

Co-authored by Dr Karl Claxton, an analyst with the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. A decade ago today, lead elements of the 1400 troops, 300 police and officials from the nine Pacific Islands Forum countries initially comprising the Regional Assistance Mission to Solomon Islands (RAMSI)

Asylum deal a nightmare for PNG and Australia

Deni ToKunai is a political commentator who writes PNG's leading political blog, The Garamut. In the public commotion and media frenzy of Kevin Rudd's announcement that a new arrangement will see Australian asylum seekers resettled in PNG, one key point has gone largely unnoticed: it was his

The Anglosphere: A view from Europe

Dr Daniel Woker is the former Swiss Ambassador to Australia and now a Senior Lecturer at the University of St Gallen. I was amused and intrigued by the recent ruminations on Tony Abbott's stated views on what the 'Anglosphere' means (apparently something anti-Asian, in Hugh White's interpretation

Kevin Rudd, you're not a good friend of PNG

Martyn Namorong is a multi-award winning writer, blogger and television presenter. In March 2008, Kevin Rudd made his first official visit to Papua New Guinea to build ties, the first such visit by an Australian prime minister in 11 years. Out of that visit was forged a special affinity and

Rudd's PNG solution will work, but it isn't right

Dr Khalid Koser is a Lowy Institute Non-Resident Fellow and Deputy Director of the Geneva Centre for Security Policy. Prime Minister Rudd's new asylum policy is likely to work. First, he has filled a dangerous political void. Even Mr Abbott appears grudgingly to condone the policy. The Labor

Boats, aid and the art of the possible

Retired Brigadier Gary Hogan has been Australia’s Defence Attaché in both Papua New Guinea and the Republic of Indonesia. In March 1964, the 'Year of Living Dangerously', Indonesian President Sukarno, speaking at a public rally, told the US ambassador in attendance to 'go to hell with your aid

Food security and Australian land

Cynthia Dearin is Managing Director of Dearin & Associates, a consulting firm focused on investment and cultural ties with the Middle East and North Africa. In the last five years the world has witnessed two major spikes in food prices, one in 2007-2008 and another in 2011. In October 2012, the

Foreign policy: Wonks are not in charge

Interesting set of foreign policy headlines from Australia's major news outlets this morning. I think it's fair to say that if you polled 200 foreign policy experts around Australia, not one would say that whaling and 'the boats' are Australia's top foreign policy priorities. Yet these are the home

The 'win-win' New Zealand-Taiwan FTA

On the measure of FTAs signed, New Zealand's 'Asian Century' project is doing better than that of its larger, louder neighbour. Last week, New Zealand became the first OECD member to sign an FTA with Taiwan. In 2008 New Zealand was the first OECD member to sign an FTA with Taiwan's larger, louder

Background for Rudd's PNG visit

With Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd in Papua New Guinea this Sunday and Monday to meet with his counterpart Peter O'Neill, it's useful to recall that the PNG PM gave an address to the Lowy Institute on 29 November last year. Post event, in an interview with the Lowy Institute's Jenny Hayward

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