Tuesday 23 May 2017 | 20:58 | SYDNEY
What's happening on

Global Issues

The international system is changing rapidly. Economic and strategic power is moving eastward; the hierarchy of states is being reshuffled; regimes of long standing, especially in the Middle East, are falling; influential new non-state actors are emerging, from al-Qaeda to WikiLeaks; and issues such as climate change and migration are climbing the international agenda. These changes are disruptive for old powers and old institutions such as the United Nations. On the other hand, the United States is proving more resilient than its doubters claim, even as the world becomes more multipolar.

The Lowy Institute watches these broad developments and examines what they mean for Australia – a middle power with regional and global interests.

Refugee detention in Indonesia

It was a morning like any other until Mohammed, the 16-year-old refugee, was arrested by Indonesian immigration officials at a local market. In order to support his family, who had fled Afghanistan to seek asylum in Indonesia, he had taken up work assisting a shopkeeper. Before he had a chance to

Securing progress in Somalia

It’s never a good sign when the recommended mode of transport through a national capital is by armoured convoy. As I bumped along the streets of Mogadishu during my visit in March, passing one sun-bleached ruin after another, I had a sense of the destruction wrought by Somalia’s years of turmoil

Trans-Pacific Partnership without America

When President Trump took America out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership in January, this seemed to be the end of the quest for a ‘platinum standard’ set of rules to govern global trade. Japan, the second-largest signatory, quickly announced that it was not interested in pursuing a TPP-11, with

457 visas: All Australia had to do was hold the line

Instead of grasping the opportunity presented by anti-migrant sentiment across the developed world, the Turnbull Government yesterday decided to join the party. And while the talking points and headlines will likely be greeted with satisfaction in some pivotal marginal seats, the rhetoric and policy

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