Monday 24 Apr 2017 | 18:44 | SYDNEY
What's happening on

Global Issues

The international system is changing rapidly. Economic and strategic power is moving eastward; the hierarchy of states is being reshuffled; regimes of long standing, especially in the Middle East, are falling; influential new non-state actors are emerging, from al-Qaeda to WikiLeaks; and issues such as climate change and migration are climbing the international agenda. These changes are disruptive for old powers and old institutions such as the United Nations. On the other hand, the United States is proving more resilient than its doubters claim, even as the world becomes more multipolar.

The Lowy Institute watches these broad developments and examines what they mean for Australia – a middle power with regional and global interests.

457 visas: All Australia had to do was hold the line

Instead of grasping the opportunity presented by anti-migrant sentiment across the developed world, the Turnbull Government yesterday decided to join the party. And while the talking points and headlines will likely be greeted with satisfaction in some pivotal marginal seats, the rhetoric and policy

Lessons from India on migration’s role in trade policy

Prime Minister Turnbull yesterday carefully signalled a potential India-Australia Free Trade Agreement is not a priority for his government. This comes after the Abbott Government set a very public benchmark for concluding an India-Australia FTA by the end of 2015, an overly optimistic commitment

Australia's role in the refugee compact

The Lowy Institute recently held an expert workshop on the Global Compact on Refugees as part of its research collaboration with the Department of Immigration and Border Protection. This is the second in a series of posts from workshop participants. 2016 was a year of ‘extraordinary meetings

Skilled migration: Solving the puzzle

Recently we were presented with duelling pictures of skilled immigration. On the one hand, we have this news report about China making it easier for highly educated migrants to stay. This is a reminder that countries compete aggressively for foreign talent and for good reason, with studies showing

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