Wednesday 26 Jul 2017 | 08:46 | SYDNEY
What's happening on
  • 25 Jul 2017 16:40

    Talisman Sabre 17: The realisation of defence strategy

    For the first time in more 30 years Australia has a military strategy that is beginning to truly align ends, ways and means.

  • 25 Jul 2017 14:41

    National security changes – Australian style

    The most effective way for the DG ONI to influence agencies and their parent departments would be to have some control over the National Intelligence Community budget.

  • 25 Jul 2017 12:13

    Empathising with China

    It is possible to both condemn China’s political system, but also accept it as an incipient great power with legitimate security concerns.

Global Issues

The international system is changing rapidly. Economic and strategic power is moving eastward; the hierarchy of states is being reshuffled; regimes of long standing, especially in the Middle East, are falling; influential new non-state actors are emerging, from al-Qaeda to WikiLeaks; and issues such as climate change and migration are climbing the international agenda. These changes are disruptive for old powers and old institutions such as the United Nations. On the other hand, the United States is proving more resilient than its doubters claim, even as the world becomes more multipolar.

The Lowy Institute watches these broad developments and examines what they mean for Australia – a middle power with regional and global interests.

The G20 Hamburg riots and the German election

In many ways, the city-state of Hamburg embodies the self-image that contemporary Germany likes to project. With sparkling new galleries and trendy cafés interspersed among rough-and-tumble beatnik quarters and burly workers' bars, it exudes an elegant but unpretentious charm. The gleaming new

Three focus points for Turnbull at G20 summit

You have to hand it to Kim Jung Un. In politics, as in comedy, timing is everything. The launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile two days before the G20 summit ensures that North Korea jumps to the top of the Summit's agenda. With one push of the button - probably practically as well as

How China views the plight of refugees

With assistance from Zixin Wang, an intern with the Lowy Institute's East Asia Program. Following World Refugee Day on 20 June, Chinese netizens have been heatedly debating whether China should accept refugees. 'Debating' may be too strong a word – social media users are for the most part

#WorldRefugeeWeek: How Australians feel about refugees

Results from the 2017 Lowy Institute Poll reveal how Australians feel about refugees being settled in Australia. Almost half (48%) of the 1200 Australians surveyed believe that refugees currently in Nauru and Manus Island detention centres should never be settled in Australia (versus 45% who agree

The liberal order is not America’s to break

As the Berlin Wall came down and the Soviet Union imploded, many attributed the change entirely to American power. The hubristic ‘unipolar moment’ claim was not only wrong as history, it proved disastrous as policy guidance, ultimately running aground in the sands of Iraq. Today, that same

Trump has compromised climate security strategies

Much has been said about the global environmental, economic and leadership consequences of US President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement but there is also a national security dimension. Trump’s decision ignores an important development in global security centred

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