Greg Colton

Areas of expertise
Australian defence and foreign policy; South Pacific state fragility; the Papua New Guinea Defence Force
Greg Colton
Biography
Publications
News and media

Lieutenant Colonel Greg Colton DSM is a regular army officer and former Research Fellow at the Lowy Institute, where he headed up the South Pacific Fragile States Project. Greg holds a BA with Honours in Contemporary East European Studies from the University of London and a Master of Defence and Military Studies from the Australian National University. In his final year as an undergraduate he worked in the Romanian Ministry of National Defence in Bucharest, during which time he wrote his thesis examining the reform of the Romanian Armed Forces as they modernised in preparation for NATO accession. After commissioning from the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, Greg served as an Infantry Officer in the British Army, including operational tours of Northern Ireland and Iraq, before transferring to the Australian Army in 2007. Since then he has visited PNG several times to deliver training in partnership with the PNG Defence Force and deployed to East Timor, Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2014, Greg participated in the Lowy Institute’s Australia – PNG Emerging Leaders Dialogue. Greg has also been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for his service as a Company Commander in Afghanistan with the 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment.

The views expressed are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Australian Army, the Department of Defence or the Australian Government.

Safeguarding Australia’s security interests through closer Pacific ties
Analyses
Safeguarding Australia’s security interests through closer Pacific ties
Greater Australian engagement in the Pacific Islands region is needed if Canberra wants to ensure regional stability and underpin Australia’s national security. Greg Colton
US National Defense Strategy may force Australia to get off the fence
US National Defense Strategy may force Australia to get off the fence
Sometimes your closest friends, rather than your rivals, cause the biggest headaches.
Defence needs to develop international engagement specialists
Defence needs to develop international engagement specialists
Not every soldier has the skills to mentor and advise foreign forces.
No zero-sum game in greater Pacific ties
No zero-sum game in greater Pacific ties
Australia can play a major role in setting the agenda to the gain of all Pacific island nations.
Time for Australia to forge free compact agreements in the Pacific
Time for Australia to forge free compact agreements in the Pacific
Tiny island nations and Australia alike will benefit from intimate ties.
To lead in the Pacific, Australia must lead on climate change
To lead in the Pacific, Australia must lead on climate change
Australia’s position as the world’s largest coal exporter does not sit easy with many Pacific Islanders.
Australia must criticise US withdrawal from UNESCO
Australia must criticise US withdrawal from UNESCO
US should be reminded that leaving UNESCO is counter to Australian values.
Fuel security: Why the RAN should prioritise the Indo-Pacific
Fuel security: Why the RAN should prioritise the Indo-Pacific
There are many factors that can comprise the national interest. Fuel security should be at the top of the list.
Commentary
The 21st century will be a battle on the urban front
Originally published in The Australian. Euan Graham , Greg Colton
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