James Goldrick

Nonresident Fellow
James Goldrick
Biography
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James Goldrick AO, CSC was a Nonresident Fellow at the Lowy Institute.

He joined the Royal Australian Navy in 1974 and retired in 2012 as a two-star Rear Admiral. He commanded HMA Ships Cessnock and Sydney (twice), the multinational maritime interception force in the Persian Gulf and the Australian Defence Force Academy. He led Australia’s Border Protection Command and later commanded the Australian Defence College. A Visiting Fellow of the Sea Power Centre-Australia, an Adjunct Professor of the University of NSW at ADFA and a Professorial Fellow of ANCORS, his research interests include naval and maritime strategic issues in the Indo-Pacific, as well as the response of navies to changing technologies and operational challenges. His books include: The King’s Ships Were at Sea: The War in the North Sea August 1914-February 1915 and No Easy Answers: The Development of the Navies of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Navies of South-East Asia: A Comparative Study, co-authored with Jack McCaffrie, will be published later in 2012.

Australia’s essential need: not seaborne trade but seaborne supply
Australia’s essential need: not seaborne trade but seaborne supply
“Sea control” is not about dominating waters but only to the extent necessary to ensure the movement needed.
Sea denial is not enough: An Australian and Indian perspective
Sea denial is not enough: An Australian and Indian perspective
Debates over naval policy need to be mounted with a full understanding of just what a nation needs to do at sea.
Defence Strategic Update 2020: A first assessment
Defence Strategic Update 2020: A first assessment
A candid assessment of Australia's challenges, but will the planned measures be enough?
China’s intelligence gathering ships change the equation
China’s intelligence gathering ships change the equation
If not quite a return to the Cold War, there are operational consequences to China’s increasing naval capabilities.
The new normal: a close naval encounter in the South China Sea
The new normal: a close naval encounter in the South China Sea
The Chinese commander’s handling of the situation was less than adept.
China’s expanding navy
China’s expanding navy
The PLA-N is growing rapidly, raising problems for personnel and the integration of new capabilities into the service.
Getting our maritime security effort right
Getting our maritime security effort right
The time has clearly come for a careful examination of what Australia needs in a civil maritime security organisation.
The limits of ‘global Britain’
The limits of ‘global Britain’
The UK can still have a voice in global issues by concentrating a diminished military closer to home.
Britain’s defence planners face hard questions
Britain’s defence planners face hard questions
Hard questions must be asked about the future of the Royal Navy and the totality of Britain’s force structure.
The Australian
25 February 2014
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