Peter Layton

Peter Layton
Biography
Publications

Dr Peter Layton is a Visiting Fellow at the Griffith Asia Institute, an Associate Fellow RUSI (UK) and a Fellow of the Australian Security Leaders Climate Group. A retired RAAF Group Captain, Peter has extensive experience in force structure development and taught national security strategy at the US National Defense University. He has written extensively on defence and security matters, and was awarded the US Exceptional Public Service medal for force structure planning work. In 2006, he won the RUSI Trench Gascoigne Essay Prize for original writing on contemporary issues of defence and international security. He is the author of the book Grand Strategy.

Buying the wrong submarine
Buying the wrong submarine
Being able to sink ships doesn’t end a war. Australia should consider ballistic nuclear missile subs as an alternative.
Answering China’s South China Sea flying safety challenge
Answering China’s South China Sea flying safety challenge
A regional response can best manage risks, and the Five Power Defence Arrangement offers just the mechanism.
A flare up in China’s deliberate pattern of aggression
A flare up in China’s deliberate pattern of aggression
The intercept of an Australian patrol over the South China Sea escalates a “grey zone” conflict to a dangerous level.
Fixing Australia’s failing Pacific Step-up strategy
Fixing Australia’s failing Pacific Step-up strategy
Supporting domestic interest groups in the region will bring success, and should be high on Canberra’s “to do” list.
In Putin’s war, everybody loses
In Putin’s war, everybody loses
The war may freeze in place, but the future peace will not be like the old peace before Russia invaded.
Time and troops in finite supply for Russia’s army in Ukraine
Time and troops in finite supply for Russia’s army in Ukraine
Forced to call in conscripts, reservists and foreign fighters, Putin’s miscalculation is beginning to bite.
Scenarios for the war in Ukraine
Scenarios for the war in Ukraine
Unexpected resistance, disaffected troops and broken supply chains present a Catch-22 for Putin on the road to Kyiv.
China’s grey zone tactics amount to far more than just laser games
China’s grey zone tactics amount to far more than just laser games
A Chinese warship’s use of a laser on an Australian surveillance plane was no accident but purposeful aggression.
Living with a feared China and Russian-built chaos
Living with a feared China and Russian-built chaos
Giving way in the face of belligerence won’t make it stop – but nor does aggression portend doom and major war.
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