Sam Roggeveen

Director, International Security Program
Areas of expertise

Australian foreign and defence policy, China’s military forces, US defence and foreign policy, drones and other military technology. Also, trends in global democracy.

Sam Roggeveen
Biography
Publications
News and media

Sam Roggeveen is Director of the Lowy Institute’s International Security Program. Before joining the Lowy Institute, Sam was a senior strategic analyst in Australia’s peak intelligence agency, the Office of National Assessments, where his work dealt mainly with North Asian strategic affairs, including nuclear strategy and Asian military forces. Sam also worked on arms control policy in Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs, and as an analyst in the Defence Intelligence Organisation.

Sam has a long-standing interest in politics and political philosophy, and in 2019 he wrote Our Very Own Brexit: Australia's Hollow Politics and Where it Could Lead Us, about the hollowing out of Western democracy and its implications for Australia. 

Sam writes for newspapers and magazines in Australia and around the world, and is a regular commentator on the Lowy Institute’s digital magazine, The Interpreter, of which he was the founding editor from 2007 to 2014.

Sam is also Director of Digital at the Lowy Institute, and editor of the Lowy Institute Papers.

Conversations: Chris Blattman on Why We Fight
Podcasts
Conversations: Chris Blattman on Why We Fight
Join the Director of the Lowy Institute’s International Security Program, Sam Roggeveen, as he talks with economist and political scientist Chris Blattman about his latest book,…
Frontier Rules: Emerging tech and challenges to the rules-based order
Interactives
Frontier Rules: Emerging tech and challenges to the rules-based order
Intensifying geopolitical competition is combining with emerging technologies to create new frontiers for statecraft and present new challenges to the rules-based order. How…
Commentary
China’s Third Aircraft Carrier Is Aimed at a Post-U.S. Asia
Beijing can’t challenge U.S. naval power directly yet. Originally published in the Foreign Policy Magazine.
Australia enters the post-party phase of Western democracy
Australia enters the post-party phase of Western democracy
Get used to governing with wafer-thin majorities or as a minority.
China: The Morrison legacy and beyond
China: The Morrison legacy and beyond
Labor is expected to persist with most of the Coalition’s foreign and defence policies. But useful changes can be made.
Chinese bases in the Pacific: A reality check
Chinese bases in the Pacific: A reality check
Frustrating Beijing’s ambitions to create a sphere of influence is overwhelmingly a diplomatic task, not a military one.
Russia-Ukraine: Lessons for Australia’s defence
Russia-Ukraine: Lessons for Australia’s defence
Great powers seek spheres of influence – but there are limits.
Indonesia makes a big defence statement
Indonesia makes a big defence statement
Canberra should look beyond the Quad and to its own backyard for an all-weather strategic friend.
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