Stephen Grenville

Nonresident Fellow
Areas of expertise

Regional economic integration; Australia's economic relations with East Asia; international financial flows and the global financial architecture; financial sector development in East Asia

Stephen Grenville
Biography
Publications
News and media

Dr Grenville is a Nonresident Fellow at the Lowy Institute. He works as a consultant on financial sector issues in East Asia. Between 1982 and 2001 he worked at the Reserve Bank of Australia, for the last five years as Deputy Governor and Board member. Before that, Dr Grenville was with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in Paris, the International Monetary Fund in Jakarta, the Australian National University and the Department of Foreign Affairs.

Capital flows to emerging economies
Capital flows to emerging economies
The International Monetary Fund’s “free-market” view is questioned by economists, who argue for policy intervention.
Commentary
A super-profits tax on resources could repair budget
Originally published in The Australian.
US monetary policy: the ripple effect
US monetary policy: the ripple effect
A new book probes the inner workings – and functional failures – of America’s enigmatic central banking system.
History lessons from “The Great Crash”?
History lessons from “The Great Crash”?
Optimists always get more airplay than spoilsports predicting an end to the good times. But hindsight tells all.
Twenty years of BRICS
Twenty years of BRICS
As analysis by acronym, it has been a stunning success. But for reorganising global economic governance?
Covid and the failure of global cooperation
Covid and the failure of global cooperation
The general public has never bought the line that international aid is in the self-interest of donors.
A rank index or a politicised process? The IMF and trouble at the top
A rank index or a politicised process? The IMF and trouble at the top
The IMF chief rejects fudging China’s ranking on a flagship index. Her fate won’t change the institution’s character.
The scope to negotiate with China on the CPTPP
The scope to negotiate with China on the CPTPP
It would be useful to have more cooperative economic ballast in relations, even as other things might deteriorate.
Commentary
Yes, we can spend our way to recovery if we are careful
Australia has rightly lost its fear of big deficits. But we must walk back debt in lockstep with private sector expansion. Originally published in The Australian Financial Review.
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