China

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BOXED_China

Since 2008, we have asked Australians a series of questions about China’s rise. China’s economic growth has had a strong impact on Australia, with China overtaking Japan to become Australia’s largest trading partner in late 2007. Yet despite its economic importance, Lowy Institute polling has shown that Australians hold a mixed, perhaps even contradictory, set of views on China.

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China

AUSTRALIA’S BEST FRIEND IN ASIA

In this year’s Poll, China now has a clear lead over Japan when we ask Australians to identify ‘Australia’s best friend in Asia’.

In 2016, 30% say China is our best friend in Asia, compared with 25% saying Japan. This is a clear shift from 2014 when we last posed this question. China and Japan ranked equally that year, with 31% nominating China and 28% Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia, in a statistically equivalent result.

Among younger Australians, China has an even clearer lead this year: 36% of 18-44 year olds see China as our best friend in Asia while only 21% of that age group regards Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia.

In another clear shift, Indonesia has overtaken Singapore and now comes third in the 2016 ‘best friend’ stakes. It is seen by 15% of Australians as our best friend in Asia, an increase of six points from 2014 when it held fourth place behind Singapore. Singapore now comes fourth, with 12% seeing it as Australia’s best friend in Asia. India and South Korea are further behind, with 6% and 4% of the population, respectively, seeing them as our best friend in Asia.

AUSTRALIA, THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

The rise of China has provoked vigorous debate about the respective roles of China and the United States in the Asia-Pacific region.

This year, we returned to a question first asked in 2014 about whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important.

In our 2016 results, China has closed the gap, and the two countries are now in a deadlock in Australians’ eyes. Public opinion is evenly divided on whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important. The number who say Australia’s relationship with the United States is the more important (43%) is exactly the same as the number who nominate the China relationship as more important (43%). In 2014 when last asked this question, 48% of Australians said the relationship with the United States was more important; 37% said China was the more important relationship.

This new deadlock does not apply evenly across the generations. In fact, the Australian population is split down the middle on the China/US question, with younger Australians under 45 years of age leaning towards China, 51% saying China is the more important relationship, and only 35% saying the United States. Conversely, 51% of older Australians (45 years and above) still see the US relationship as more important, only 36% choosing China.

ATTITUDES TO CHINA

In the 2016 Poll, we presented a series of eight possible factors and asked Australians whether each was a positive or negative influence on their overall view of China.

The results suggest Australians see much to admire about China, but some aspects of Chinese society and policy elicit very negative responses, particularly among older generations of Australians. Chinese people, culture and history, and China’s economic growth are strongly positive influences on attitudes, with 85% of Australians saying ‘Chinese people [they] have met’ are a positive influence on their view of China, while 79% see ‘China’s culture and history’ as a positive influence and 75% see its economic growth as a positive influence on their view.


On the opposite side of the ledger, Australians react most strongly to ‘China’s human rights record’, with 86% of the Australian public saying it has a negative influence on their views.

‘China’s military activities in our region’ also provoke strong responses, with 79% saying these influence their views negatively. Other negative influences are ‘China’s system of government’ (73% saying it negatively influences their view), its ‘environmental policies’ (67%) and ‘Chinese investment in Australia’ (59%). Some of these factors weigh more heavily on older Australians, including China’s human rights record (93% of those 60 years and older saying a negative influence), China’s military activities (88% of those 45 years and older saying a negative influence), and Chinese investment (a negative influence for 65% of those 60 years and older).

In 2016, Australians’ feelings towards China sit at a warmish 58° on the Lowy Institute thermometer of feelings towards other countries, the same result as in 2015.

FREEDOM OF NAVIGATION IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA

In the past two years, tensions have heightened between China and its neighbours over Beijing’s activities in the South China Sea. China’s construction of runways and buildings on rocks and submerged reefs in the Spratly Islands has strained relations in the region and caused friction between China and the United States, while the Philippines has raised a legal challenge questioning China’s maritime claims. US Navy ships have conducted three ‘freedom of navigation’ operations since October 2015 to challenge excessive maritime claims in the South China Sea.

To gauge Australians’ reaction to this, we asked this year whether they are ‘in favour or against Australia conducting similar operations in an effort to ensure freedom of navigation in the South China Sea’. In a remarkably strong response, 74% of the public are in favour of Australia conducting similar operations, with only 20% against.

CHINA’S ECONOMY

While most Australians view China’s economic growth positively, public opinion is divided on whether this growth will continue at the rapid pace of the past three decades. China’s real gross domestic product has increased nearly 10% per annum on average since 1978, but the pace of growth has begun to slow.

Views in 2016 on the future of the Chinese economy are mixed, with 52% saying that ‘China’s economy will continue to grow strongly and this will benefit Australia’, and 44% saying that ‘China’s economy will slow down and the Australian economy will suffer’. Lowy Institute polling in the past has found that the majority of Australians see China as by far the most important economy to Australia, with 76% saying China was ‘the most important economy to Australia’ in 2013, well ahead of both the United States and Japan (16% named the United States as our most important economy in 2013, and 5% named Japan).

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Best Friend in Asia

In your personal opinion, which one of the following countries is Australia’s best friend in Asia?


  • HOW TO USE
    • Hover cursor over chart segments to view data. Click responses in the legend to switch individual results on and off.

close

China

AUSTRALIA’S BEST FRIEND IN ASIA

In this year’s Poll, China now has a clear lead over Japan when we ask Australians to identify ‘Australia’s best friend in Asia’.

In 2016, 30% say China is our best friend in Asia, compared with 25% saying Japan. This is a clear shift from 2014 when we last posed this question. China and Japan ranked equally that year, with 31% nominating China and 28% Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia, in a statistically equivalent result.

Among younger Australians, China has an even clearer lead this year: 36% of 18-44 year olds see China as our best friend in Asia while only 21% of that age group regards Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia.

In another clear shift, Indonesia has overtaken Singapore and now comes third in the 2016 ‘best friend’ stakes. It is seen by 15% of Australians as our best friend in Asia, an increase of six points from 2014 when it held fourth place behind Singapore. Singapore now comes fourth, with 12% seeing it as Australia’s best friend in Asia. India and South Korea are further behind, with 6% and 4% of the population, respectively, seeing them as our best friend in Asia.

AUSTRALIA, THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

The rise of China has provoked vigorous debate about the respective roles of China and the United States in the Asia-Pacific region.

This year, we returned to a question first asked in 2014 about whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important.

In our 2016 results, China has closed the gap, and the two countries are now in a deadlock in Australians’ eyes. Public opinion is evenly divided on whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important. The number who say Australia’s relationship with the United States is the more important (43%) is exactly the same as the number who nominate the China relationship as more important (43%). In 2014 when last asked this question, 48% of Australians said the relationship with the United States was more important; 37% said China was the more important relationship.

This new deadlock does not apply evenly across the generations. In fact, the Australian population is split down the middle on the China/US question, with younger Australians under 45 years of age leaning towards China, 51% saying China is the more important relationship, and only 35% saying the United States. Conversely, 51% of older Australians (45 years and above) still see the US relationship as more important, only 36% choosing China.

ATTITUDES TO CHINA

In the 2016 Poll, we presented a series of eight possible factors and asked Australians whether each was a positive or negative influence on their overall view of China.

The results suggest Australians see much to admire about China, but some aspects of Chinese society and policy elicit very negative responses, particularly among older generations of Australians. Chinese people, culture and history, and China’s economic growth are strongly positive influences on attitudes, with 85% of Australians saying ‘Chinese people [they] have met’ are a positive influence on their view of China, while 79% see ‘China’s culture and history’ as a positive influence and 75% see its economic growth as a positive influence on their view.


On the opposite side of the ledger, Australians react most strongly to ‘China’s human rights record’, with 86% of the Australian public saying it has a negative influence on their views.

‘China’s military activities in our region’ also provoke strong responses, with 79% saying these influence their views negatively. Other negative influences are ‘China’s system of government’ (73% saying it negatively influences their view), its ‘environmental policies’ (67%) and ‘Chinese investment in Australia’ (59%). Some of these factors weigh more heavily on older Australians, including China’s human rights record (93% of those 60 years and older saying a negative influence), China’s military activities (88% of those 45 years and older saying a negative influence), and Chinese investment (a negative influence for 65% of those 60 years and older).

In 2016, Australians’ feelings towards China sit at a warmish 58° on the Lowy Institute thermometer of feelings towards other countries, the same result as in 2015.

FREEDOM OF NAVIGATION IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA

In the past two years, tensions have heightened between China and its neighbours over Beijing’s activities in the South China Sea. China’s construction of runways and buildings on rocks and submerged reefs in the Spratly Islands has strained relations in the region and caused friction between China and the United States, while the Philippines has raised a legal challenge questioning China’s maritime claims. US Navy ships have conducted three ‘freedom of navigation’ operations since October 2015 to challenge excessive maritime claims in the South China Sea.

To gauge Australians’ reaction to this, we asked this year whether they are ‘in favour or against Australia conducting similar operations in an effort to ensure freedom of navigation in the South China Sea’. In a remarkably strong response, 74% of the public are in favour of Australia conducting similar operations, with only 20% against.

CHINA’S ECONOMY

While most Australians view China’s economic growth positively, public opinion is divided on whether this growth will continue at the rapid pace of the past three decades. China’s real gross domestic product has increased nearly 10% per annum on average since 1978, but the pace of growth has begun to slow.

Views in 2016 on the future of the Chinese economy are mixed, with 52% saying that ‘China’s economy will continue to grow strongly and this will benefit Australia’, and 44% saying that ‘China’s economy will slow down and the Australian economy will suffer’. Lowy Institute polling in the past has found that the majority of Australians see China as by far the most important economy to Australia, with 76% saying China was ‘the most important economy to Australia’ in 2013, well ahead of both the United States and Japan (16% named the United States as our most important economy in 2013, and 5% named Japan).

close

Australia, US and China

Which relationship do you think is more important to Australia?


  • HOW TO USE
    • Hover cursor over chart segments to view data. Click responses in the legend to switch individual results on and off.

close

China

AUSTRALIA’S BEST FRIEND IN ASIA

In this year’s Poll, China now has a clear lead over Japan when we ask Australians to identify ‘Australia’s best friend in Asia’.

In 2016, 30% say China is our best friend in Asia, compared with 25% saying Japan. This is a clear shift from 2014 when we last posed this question. China and Japan ranked equally that year, with 31% nominating China and 28% Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia, in a statistically equivalent result.

Among younger Australians, China has an even clearer lead this year: 36% of 18-44 year olds see China as our best friend in Asia while only 21% of that age group regards Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia.

In another clear shift, Indonesia has overtaken Singapore and now comes third in the 2016 ‘best friend’ stakes. It is seen by 15% of Australians as our best friend in Asia, an increase of six points from 2014 when it held fourth place behind Singapore. Singapore now comes fourth, with 12% seeing it as Australia’s best friend in Asia. India and South Korea are further behind, with 6% and 4% of the population, respectively, seeing them as our best friend in Asia.

AUSTRALIA, THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

The rise of China has provoked vigorous debate about the respective roles of China and the United States in the Asia-Pacific region.

This year, we returned to a question first asked in 2014 about whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important.

In our 2016 results, China has closed the gap, and the two countries are now in a deadlock in Australians’ eyes. Public opinion is evenly divided on whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important. The number who say Australia’s relationship with the United States is the more important (43%) is exactly the same as the number who nominate the China relationship as more important (43%). In 2014 when last asked this question, 48% of Australians said the relationship with the United States was more important; 37% said China was the more important relationship.

This new deadlock does not apply evenly across the generations. In fact, the Australian population is split down the middle on the China/US question, with younger Australians under 45 years of age leaning towards China, 51% saying China is the more important relationship, and only 35% saying the United States. Conversely, 51% of older Australians (45 years and above) still see the US relationship as more important, only 36% choosing China.

ATTITUDES TO CHINA

In the 2016 Poll, we presented a series of eight possible factors and asked Australians whether each was a positive or negative influence on their overall view of China.

The results suggest Australians see much to admire about China, but some aspects of Chinese society and policy elicit very negative responses, particularly among older generations of Australians. Chinese people, culture and history, and China’s economic growth are strongly positive influences on attitudes, with 85% of Australians saying ‘Chinese people [they] have met’ are a positive influence on their view of China, while 79% see ‘China’s culture and history’ as a positive influence and 75% see its economic growth as a positive influence on their view.


On the opposite side of the ledger, Australians react most strongly to ‘China’s human rights record’, with 86% of the Australian public saying it has a negative influence on their views.

‘China’s military activities in our region’ also provoke strong responses, with 79% saying these influence their views negatively. Other negative influences are ‘China’s system of government’ (73% saying it negatively influences their view), its ‘environmental policies’ (67%) and ‘Chinese investment in Australia’ (59%). Some of these factors weigh more heavily on older Australians, including China’s human rights record (93% of those 60 years and older saying a negative influence), China’s military activities (88% of those 45 years and older saying a negative influence), and Chinese investment (a negative influence for 65% of those 60 years and older).

In 2016, Australians’ feelings towards China sit at a warmish 58° on the Lowy Institute thermometer of feelings towards other countries, the same result as in 2015.

FREEDOM OF NAVIGATION IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA

In the past two years, tensions have heightened between China and its neighbours over Beijing’s activities in the South China Sea. China’s construction of runways and buildings on rocks and submerged reefs in the Spratly Islands has strained relations in the region and caused friction between China and the United States, while the Philippines has raised a legal challenge questioning China’s maritime claims. US Navy ships have conducted three ‘freedom of navigation’ operations since October 2015 to challenge excessive maritime claims in the South China Sea.

To gauge Australians’ reaction to this, we asked this year whether they are ‘in favour or against Australia conducting similar operations in an effort to ensure freedom of navigation in the South China Sea’. In a remarkably strong response, 74% of the public are in favour of Australia conducting similar operations, with only 20% against.

CHINA’S ECONOMY

While most Australians view China’s economic growth positively, public opinion is divided on whether this growth will continue at the rapid pace of the past three decades. China’s real gross domestic product has increased nearly 10% per annum on average since 1978, but the pace of growth has begun to slow.

Views in 2016 on the future of the Chinese economy are mixed, with 52% saying that ‘China’s economy will continue to grow strongly and this will benefit Australia’, and 44% saying that ‘China’s economy will slow down and the Australian economy will suffer’. Lowy Institute polling in the past has found that the majority of Australians see China as by far the most important economy to Australia, with 76% saying China was ‘the most important economy to Australia’ in 2013, well ahead of both the United States and Japan (16% named the United States as our most important economy in 2013, and 5% named Japan).

close

Attitudes to China

For each of the following factors, please say whether, for you personally, they have a positive or negative influence on your overall view of China:


  • HOW TO USE
    • Hover cursor over chart segments to view data. Click responses in the legend to switch individual results on and off.

close

China

AUSTRALIA’S BEST FRIEND IN ASIA

In this year’s Poll, China now has a clear lead over Japan when we ask Australians to identify ‘Australia’s best friend in Asia’.

In 2016, 30% say China is our best friend in Asia, compared with 25% saying Japan. This is a clear shift from 2014 when we last posed this question. China and Japan ranked equally that year, with 31% nominating China and 28% Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia, in a statistically equivalent result.

Among younger Australians, China has an even clearer lead this year: 36% of 18-44 year olds see China as our best friend in Asia while only 21% of that age group regards Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia.

In another clear shift, Indonesia has overtaken Singapore and now comes third in the 2016 ‘best friend’ stakes. It is seen by 15% of Australians as our best friend in Asia, an increase of six points from 2014 when it held fourth place behind Singapore. Singapore now comes fourth, with 12% seeing it as Australia’s best friend in Asia. India and South Korea are further behind, with 6% and 4% of the population, respectively, seeing them as our best friend in Asia.

AUSTRALIA, THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

The rise of China has provoked vigorous debate about the respective roles of China and the United States in the Asia-Pacific region.

This year, we returned to a question first asked in 2014 about whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important.

In our 2016 results, China has closed the gap, and the two countries are now in a deadlock in Australians’ eyes. Public opinion is evenly divided on whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important. The number who say Australia’s relationship with the United States is the more important (43%) is exactly the same as the number who nominate the China relationship as more important (43%). In 2014 when last asked this question, 48% of Australians said the relationship with the United States was more important; 37% said China was the more important relationship.

This new deadlock does not apply evenly across the generations. In fact, the Australian population is split down the middle on the China/US question, with younger Australians under 45 years of age leaning towards China, 51% saying China is the more important relationship, and only 35% saying the United States. Conversely, 51% of older Australians (45 years and above) still see the US relationship as more important, only 36% choosing China.

ATTITUDES TO CHINA

In the 2016 Poll, we presented a series of eight possible factors and asked Australians whether each was a positive or negative influence on their overall view of China.

The results suggest Australians see much to admire about China, but some aspects of Chinese society and policy elicit very negative responses, particularly among older generations of Australians. Chinese people, culture and history, and China’s economic growth are strongly positive influences on attitudes, with 85% of Australians saying ‘Chinese people [they] have met’ are a positive influence on their view of China, while 79% see ‘China’s culture and history’ as a positive influence and 75% see its economic growth as a positive influence on their view.


On the opposite side of the ledger, Australians react most strongly to ‘China’s human rights record’, with 86% of the Australian public saying it has a negative influence on their views.

‘China’s military activities in our region’ also provoke strong responses, with 79% saying these influence their views negatively. Other negative influences are ‘China’s system of government’ (73% saying it negatively influences their view), its ‘environmental policies’ (67%) and ‘Chinese investment in Australia’ (59%). Some of these factors weigh more heavily on older Australians, including China’s human rights record (93% of those 60 years and older saying a negative influence), China’s military activities (88% of those 45 years and older saying a negative influence), and Chinese investment (a negative influence for 65% of those 60 years and older).

In 2016, Australians’ feelings towards China sit at a warmish 58° on the Lowy Institute thermometer of feelings towards other countries, the same result as in 2015.

FREEDOM OF NAVIGATION IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA

In the past two years, tensions have heightened between China and its neighbours over Beijing’s activities in the South China Sea. China’s construction of runways and buildings on rocks and submerged reefs in the Spratly Islands has strained relations in the region and caused friction between China and the United States, while the Philippines has raised a legal challenge questioning China’s maritime claims. US Navy ships have conducted three ‘freedom of navigation’ operations since October 2015 to challenge excessive maritime claims in the South China Sea.

To gauge Australians’ reaction to this, we asked this year whether they are ‘in favour or against Australia conducting similar operations in an effort to ensure freedom of navigation in the South China Sea’. In a remarkably strong response, 74% of the public are in favour of Australia conducting similar operations, with only 20% against.

CHINA’S ECONOMY

While most Australians view China’s economic growth positively, public opinion is divided on whether this growth will continue at the rapid pace of the past three decades. China’s real gross domestic product has increased nearly 10% per annum on average since 1978, but the pace of growth has begun to slow.

Views in 2016 on the future of the Chinese economy are mixed, with 52% saying that ‘China’s economy will continue to grow strongly and this will benefit Australia’, and 44% saying that ‘China’s economy will slow down and the Australian economy will suffer’. Lowy Institute polling in the past has found that the majority of Australians see China as by far the most important economy to Australia, with 76% saying China was ‘the most important economy to Australia’ in 2013, well ahead of both the United States and Japan (16% named the United States as our most important economy in 2013, and 5% named Japan).

close

Freedom of Navigation in the South China Sea

In response to China’s increasing military activities in the South China Sea, the United States has been conducting maritime operations designed to ensure freedom of navigation in the region. Are you personally in favour or against Australia conducting similar operations in an effort to ensure freedom of navigation in the South China Sea?


  • HOW TO USE
    • Click segment of chart to isolate data

close

China

AUSTRALIA’S BEST FRIEND IN ASIA

In this year’s Poll, China now has a clear lead over Japan when we ask Australians to identify ‘Australia’s best friend in Asia’.

In 2016, 30% say China is our best friend in Asia, compared with 25% saying Japan. This is a clear shift from 2014 when we last posed this question. China and Japan ranked equally that year, with 31% nominating China and 28% Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia, in a statistically equivalent result.

Among younger Australians, China has an even clearer lead this year: 36% of 18-44 year olds see China as our best friend in Asia while only 21% of that age group regards Japan as Australia’s best friend in Asia.

In another clear shift, Indonesia has overtaken Singapore and now comes third in the 2016 ‘best friend’ stakes. It is seen by 15% of Australians as our best friend in Asia, an increase of six points from 2014 when it held fourth place behind Singapore. Singapore now comes fourth, with 12% seeing it as Australia’s best friend in Asia. India and South Korea are further behind, with 6% and 4% of the population, respectively, seeing them as our best friend in Asia.

AUSTRALIA, THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

The rise of China has provoked vigorous debate about the respective roles of China and the United States in the Asia-Pacific region.

This year, we returned to a question first asked in 2014 about whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important.

In our 2016 results, China has closed the gap, and the two countries are now in a deadlock in Australians’ eyes. Public opinion is evenly divided on whether Australia’s relationship with China or the United States is the more important. The number who say Australia’s relationship with the United States is the more important (43%) is exactly the same as the number who nominate the China relationship as more important (43%). In 2014 when last asked this question, 48% of Australians said the relationship with the United States was more important; 37% said China was the more important relationship.

This new deadlock does not apply evenly across the generations. In fact, the Australian population is split down the middle on the China/US question, with younger Australians under 45 years of age leaning towards China, 51% saying China is the more important relationship, and only 35% saying the United States. Conversely, 51% of older Australians (45 years and above) still see the US relationship as more important, only 36% choosing China.

ATTITUDES TO CHINA

In the 2016 Poll, we presented a series of eight possible factors and asked Australians whether each was a positive or negative influence on their overall view of China.

The results suggest Australians see much to admire about China, but some aspects of Chinese society and policy elicit very negative responses, particularly among older generations of Australians. Chinese people, culture and history, and China’s economic growth are strongly positive influences on attitudes, with 85% of Australians saying ‘Chinese people [they] have met’ are a positive influence on their view of China, while 79% see ‘China’s culture and history’ as a positive influence and 75% see its economic growth as a positive influence on their view.


On the opposite side of the ledger, Australians react most strongly to ‘China’s human rights record’, with 86% of the Australian public saying it has a negative influence on their views.

‘China’s military activities in our region’ also provoke strong responses, with 79% saying these influence their views negatively. Other negative influences are ‘China’s system of government’ (73% saying it negatively influences their view), its ‘environmental policies’ (67%) and ‘Chinese investment in Australia’ (59%). Some of these factors weigh more heavily on older Australians, including China’s human rights record (93% of those 60 years and older saying a negative influence), China’s military activities (88% of those 45 years and older saying a negative influence), and Chinese investment (a negative influence for 65% of those 60 years and older).

In 2016, Australians’ feelings towards China sit at a warmish 58° on the Lowy Institute thermometer of feelings towards other countries, the same result as in 2015.

FREEDOM OF NAVIGATION IN THE SOUTH CHINA SEA

In the past two years, tensions have heightened between China and its neighbours over Beijing’s activities in the South China Sea. China’s construction of runways and buildings on rocks and submerged reefs in the Spratly Islands has strained relations in the region and caused friction between China and the United States, while the Philippines has raised a legal challenge questioning China’s maritime claims. US Navy ships have conducted three ‘freedom of navigation’ operations since October 2015 to challenge excessive maritime claims in the South China Sea.

To gauge Australians’ reaction to this, we asked this year whether they are ‘in favour or against Australia conducting similar operations in an effort to ensure freedom of navigation in the South China Sea’. In a remarkably strong response, 74% of the public are in favour of Australia conducting similar operations, with only 20% against.

CHINA’S ECONOMY

While most Australians view China’s economic growth positively, public opinion is divided on whether this growth will continue at the rapid pace of the past three decades. China’s real gross domestic product has increased nearly 10% per annum on average since 1978, but the pace of growth has begun to slow.

Views in 2016 on the future of the Chinese economy are mixed, with 52% saying that ‘China’s economy will continue to grow strongly and this will benefit Australia’, and 44% saying that ‘China’s economy will slow down and the Australian economy will suffer’. Lowy Institute polling in the past has found that the majority of Australians see China as by far the most important economy to Australia, with 76% saying China was ‘the most important economy to Australia’ in 2013, well ahead of both the United States and Japan (16% named the United States as our most important economy in 2013, and 5% named Japan).

close

China’s Economy

Please tell me which statement most closely matches your own opinion about China’s economy in the next five years:


  • HOW TO USE
    • Click segment of chart to isolate data